Category: Presenting


I created this A3 colour poster after reading Chapter 1 of Comprehension Connections. I wanted to share what I had read with Trish and Bob while, at the same time, making something that would be useful to me and others. If you would like one of these printed on nice glossy paper, let me know:

This is Elmarie’s class blog. She has embedded a Wallwisher page as a way of collecting her students’ thinking. She is asking parents to speak to their children about school and get them to tell them what they enjoyed most about school this week. Then, the parents “post a sticky” on the wall to share what their kids said. How cool is that?

Kids are kids, and many adults are kids too. One of the things that struck me when I spent some time down in Early Years was the power of play in learning, and particularly the power of role-play. Early years classrooms have dress-ups and role-play areas where the kids can immerse themselves in the contexts of their units of inquiry. Teachers may, during a unit about transport and travel, create a travel agency where the students buy and sell flights, bus journeys and ferry crossings. Why do we stop doing these things as our students get older?

I decided to ask my students to start collecting clothes and props so we can have a role-play area too, I decided to make drama a regular part of what we do in the classroom, I decided to give my students more opportunities to develop their ability to put themselves in other people’s shoes though acting. The students have responded really well to this.

I’ll video some of the role-plays that we put together this year and share them on this blog.

This is a really interesting video about how science and dance can work together. I was skeptical at first, I have to admit, but as I watched the video I saw genuine conceptual connections that definitely deepened the students’ understanding of the science, and also helped them to understand how they can communicate through dance.

Try to ignore the ridiculous amount of times the boys say “like” though!!!

This is a wonderful posting by Cristina Milos on a collaborative blog put together by Edna Sackson, both regular visitors and commentors on Art of Language.

The reason I have put it on here is because, although it is primarily about inquiry and taking students beyond the facts, it is also very rich in language and in the use of language to unlock and deepen student-thinking. It encapsulates the sentiments that all of our teaching teams expressed about language as a “vehicle for inquiry”.

Click on the image to get to the posting. Please feel free to comment either on here or on the posting itself.

Technology is great. But, there’s only a few technology innovations that really do open up a myriad of possibilities that cannot be done easily on a bit of paper or with other, more traditional methods!\

Voicethread is one of them.

Click on the image above to read an outstanding article about Voicethread and to get loads of ideas for how Voicethread could be used in your teaching.

 

 

I find it really exciting to walk into a room – even when the students and teachers are not there – and be able to get a real sense of what the students of that class are thinking about, and how they are thinking. Recently, when walking around NIST, I was really impressed by the amount of visible thinking I found, and the variety of ways that teachers are “extracting” that thinking from their students and then displaying it so that the walls do actually speak.

How wonderful for students to be immersed in their own thoughts, interacting with displays and surrounded by relevance at all times!

What visible thinking strategies have worked well for you?

When going through Kelli’s photos of her SLCs, I was blown away by the richness of the experiences that were being had by the students and parents of her class. Even though these are “silent” photographs, each picture definitely “tells a thousand words”. The language, both English and mother-tongue, must have been so rich in that room!

One of the main things we can learn from this set of photos is the immeasurable value of taking photos as a way of gathering assessment data. Kelli learned a lot about her students by watching them so closely through the lens of the camera. She knew what she was hoping to see and then captured it visually.

Check out the parents who built a puppet theatre from scratch – priceless!

What were the highlights of your SLCs?

David Crystal’s “Language and the Internet” is a very timely and provocative read:

“In recent years, the Internet has come to dominate our lives. E-mail, instant messaging and chat are rapidly replacing conventional forms of correspondence, and the Web has become the first port of call for both information inquiry and leisure activity.

How is this affecting language? There is a widespread view that as ‘technospeak” comes to rule, standards will be lost. In this book, David Crystal argues the reverse: that the Internet has encouraged a dramatic expansion in the variety and creativity of language.”


I’m undecided about all of this, I do see his point and I am helping my students to be as literate in this new era as possible. However, I am also fearful of some of the other trends I see: the Year 8 students who don’t play or talk with each other in the mornings now they have laptops to stare at, the over-reliance on the Internet for research when books, people and observations would be better options, the Facebook-update-style way that kids are starting to say sentences… expecting a “comment”, “like” or “share” at the end of each one!

Where do we go with this as educators?

I have been to two planning sessions with Year 1. The aim of the sessions was to use the PYP Language Scope & Sequence document to identify the receptive and expressive language that could be used and developed during their next unit of inquiry.

The unit looked pretty tough at first glance because the central idea seems pretty complex and also a little strange to be doing with Year 1 students!

One thing that struck me when I looked at the planner was that it didn’t seem to have a clear purpose and the understandings the team were hoping to illicit from the students were also not that clear. This is not the fault of the Y1 Team as this was a unit they hadn’t created themselves and was also one they really struggled to get their heads around last year. However, they did say that it turned out to be one of the best units of the year!!!

I have found that, unless we are very clear about where we are trying to take students it is very difficult to plan for the language that will be used and developed in the unit. This quote really helped me to understand that:

My interpretation of this proverb is that, without a clear sense of where a unit is headed teachers could just pluck at any seemingly relevant, random activities. How often have you sat in planning meetings where enough time hasn’t been devoted to clearly establishing the understandings you’re hoping for, and where loads of time is spent coming up with random activities that may or may not take understanding further or deeper? I have sat in hundreds of them!

I asked the team if we could use a strategy I learned from Chris Frost, now PYP Coordinator at Tokyo International School.

Once they have checked out the central idea and chosen their key PYP Concepts, Chris gets his teaching teams to write simple sentences to explain why those concepts are so useful. The sentences start with

“We want the students to understand that…”

Here’s some examples from planners created at Chris’ former school:

From Farm to Table

The Arty Party 2007

The Global Village UOI planner

When Disaster Strikes

Here are the sentences that the Year 1  Team created for the concepts of form and perspective:

“We want the students to understand that images can highlight different features of Thailand.”

“We want the students to understand that tourists and residents see places differently.”

By identifying these conceptual understandings, we really had a strong sense of what the unit is all about, and also where language fits into it.

The next phase was to look at the Scope & Sequence document to identify the receptive and expressive language within the unit. I left this display on the wall of their meeting room for a week:

During the week, they highlighted the conceptual understandings and learning outcomes that they felt were within the unit. The strand of language that dominated was Viewing & Presenting, so we focused on that in our next meeting. These are the things they highlighted:

Conceptual Understandings

Phase One: “We can enjoy and learn from visual language.”

Phase Two: “People use static and moving images to communicate ideas and information.”

Learning Outcomes

Phase One:

“reveal their own feelings in response to visual presentations” and “make personal connections to visual texts.”

Phase Two:

“attend to visual information showing understanding through discussion, role-play, illustrations”

“talk about their own feelings in response to visual messages; show empathy for the way others might feel”

“show their understanding that visual messages influence our behaviour”

“connect visual information with their own experiences to construct their own meaning”

“observe and discuss illustrations in picture books and simple reference books, commenting on the information being conveyed”

“become aware of the use and organization of visual effects to create a particular impact”

“observe visual images and begin to appreciate, and be able to express, they they have been created to achieve particular purposes”

Phase Three

“discuss their own feelings in response to visual messages; listen to other responses, realizing that people react differently”

“view a range of visual language formats and discuss their effectiveness, for example, film/video, posters, drama”

At this point the connections, the teaching ideas started to flow very naturally. The ideas were so good and so powerful that I really wanted to stay in Year 1 for a while to help them teach it!!!