Category: Listening


This video contains two clips from reading conferences in 4NB. By involving the students in assessing their own work using the Writing Continuum, Nicky has empowered these two students to think about and discuss who they are as writers. The second clip shows that teachers often need to help students to make the connections between what they would normally say about their writing and the language of the writing continuum.

There is a question at the end of the video. It would be wonderful to hear about your approaches to getting students really involved in the assessment of their writing…

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“Unless ideas are massaged into reality, they evaporate” Alan Fletcher

But, how do we capture our ideas?

In Year 6, every student has a “Bubblecatcher” in which they write notes, quotes, checklists, ideas and questions. It’s basically just a notebook, but it’s one they have been and bought themselves. The cool name comes from a guest speaker and author, who also happens to be a parent of a kid in Year 7!

I would like to put together a video to feature how people in the school use notebooks. If you’d be willing to say a few words and share your notebook briefly on this video, please let me know.

In the meantime, please comment and tell us how you catch your bubbles!!!

Listen to the way these students explain what they are doing and invite other people into their learning by being so articulate, expressive, honest and confident. Which conceptual understandings are these kids displaying?

This is a really interesting video about how science and dance can work together. I was skeptical at first, I have to admit, but as I watched the video I saw genuine conceptual connections that definitely deepened the students’ understanding of the science, and also helped them to understand how they can communicate through dance.

Try to ignore the ridiculous amount of times the boys say “like” though!!!

Technology is great. But, there’s only a few technology innovations that really do open up a myriad of possibilities that cannot be done easily on a bit of paper or with other, more traditional methods!\

Voicethread is one of them.

Click on the image above to read an outstanding article about Voicethread and to get loads of ideas for how Voicethread could be used in your teaching.

 

 

Glenn found this fascinating presentation about listening and about the need for schools to think about whether or not they are teaching it as a specific “language art”. We showed it to Year 6 students and they all agreed that we do have “listening problems” in this day and age. They were able to talk openly about their own listening issues and what could be done to improve them. Many of them have asked for three minutes of silence each day!

It is worth watching this video in a team meeting some time. It will spark good conversations, but it will also enable you to reflect on the teaching of listening.

Do you have any good listening games or strategies that you could share with us?

Love this, such a powerful experience for kids and their teachers.

Does anyone else do “buddy reading” or anything else like that? Have you done it before? What benefits did you notice?

When going through Kelli’s photos of her SLCs, I was blown away by the richness of the experiences that were being had by the students and parents of her class. Even though these are “silent” photographs, each picture definitely “tells a thousand words”. The language, both English and mother-tongue, must have been so rich in that room!

One of the main things we can learn from this set of photos is the immeasurable value of taking photos as a way of gathering assessment data. Kelli learned a lot about her students by watching them so closely through the lens of the camera. She knew what she was hoping to see and then captured it visually.

Check out the parents who built a puppet theatre from scratch – priceless!

What were the highlights of your SLCs?

David Crystal’s “Language and the Internet” is a very timely and provocative read:

“In recent years, the Internet has come to dominate our lives. E-mail, instant messaging and chat are rapidly replacing conventional forms of correspondence, and the Web has become the first port of call for both information inquiry and leisure activity.

How is this affecting language? There is a widespread view that as ‘technospeak” comes to rule, standards will be lost. In this book, David Crystal argues the reverse: that the Internet has encouraged a dramatic expansion in the variety and creativity of language.”


I’m undecided about all of this, I do see his point and I am helping my students to be as literate in this new era as possible. However, I am also fearful of some of the other trends I see: the Year 8 students who don’t play or talk with each other in the mornings now they have laptops to stare at, the over-reliance on the Internet for research when books, people and observations would be better options, the Facebook-update-style way that kids are starting to say sentences… expecting a “comment”, “like” or “share” at the end of each one!

Where do we go with this as educators?

Using the distinction between receptive and expressive language that is outlined here…

… the Year 4 Team and I looked at the language within their next unit of inquiry. The photo above shows the simple way that we collected our thoughts. The document below shows the information after a bit more work after meeting. It’s a great overview of the richness of language learning that will take place in the unit.